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"Penguin's Big Score": The Penguin conspires with the Joker in an effort to become the new "top dog" of Gotham's underworld. He publicly renounces crime and seemingly overnight, becomes one of the most philanthropic men in the entire c


Quote1.png I must say, sir, that when I observe the Penguin's efforts at conquering the field of public opinion... I find myself wishing he'd stuck to crime. Quote2.png
Alfred Pennyworth

Batman Adventures #1 is an issue of the series Batman Adventures (Volume 1) with a cover date of October, 1992.

Synopsis for "Penguin's Big Score"

The Penguin conspires with the Joker in an effort to become the new "top dog" of Gotham's underworld. He publicly renounces crime and seemingly overnight, becomes one of the most philanthropic men in the entire city. He appears on television talk shows announcing his pledge to help out Gotham's various charity foundations.

In the Batcave, Batman and Alfred are incredulous of the supposedly reformed Penguin. Batman knows that he's working an angle, but has yet to figure out what it is.

He soon learns that the Penguin is secretly robbing institutions owned by Gotham's wealthiest industrialists, thus bankrupting them, and enabling him to take their place as a community leader. Bruce Wayne engineers a trap, baiting the Penguin to break into the Wayne Financial Institution. The Penguin falls for the trap, and Wayne apprehends the Penguin and his goons as Batman. He is unaware of the Joker's involvement in the Penguin's rise and subsequent fall from power.

Appearing in "Penguin's Big Score"

Featured Characters:

Supporting Characters:

Antagonists:

  • Joker
  • Penguin
    • Clarence (Single appearance)
    • Grant (Single appearance)
    • Lefty (Single appearance)
    • Otto (Single appearance)
    • Rocko (Single appearance)
    • Stefan (Single appearance)

Other Characters:

  • Mayor Hill
  • Leland Carnegie (Behind the scenes)
  • Ross (Single appearance) (On a TV or computer screen)
  • Valerie Vapid (Single appearance)

Locations:

Items:

Vehicles:

Notes

Trivia

  • The Penguin's trait of (mis)using long, complex words in this story stems from the Batman: The Animated Series Writer's Bible. Ironically, this trait rarely - if ever - appeared in the TV series itself.
  • Both of the Penguin's definitions for "arteriosclerosis" ("the right to assemble" and "the condition of inserting a large steel rod into the brain through the nose") are wrong; it actually refers to a medical condition where the walls of the arteries thicken and harden.


See Also

Recommended Reading

Links and References